CSS-Reset – minimizing browser rendering problems

If you have just a little experience on creating web designs you might have stumbled upon the differences between the browser engines.

Till now you might have tried to fix every render bug after another hoping that you still can finish in time.

Eric Meyer, yes the Eric Meyer, was tired of this problem too and created a template to reset all the common differences to a certain standard. If you start your webdesign based on this stylesheet, your design should yield much fewer rendering errors and you won’t have to worry that much about the creepy IE6 or some less common browsers.

Link: Eric’s Archived Thoughts: Reset Reloaded.

About stevie

Born in the north of Germany, raised in Berlin and stayed there since. After graduating, studying applied computer science at the FHTW Berlin (now HTW Berlin), I started my own company with a former fellow student, providing high class application solutions for web and desktop for small and medium companies (see www.jnamic.com (english version to be finished) for more information). My personal favorite programming languages are PHP for the web and Java for everything else - although I must admit Java evolved very much in the past few years. I love to code and build new applications from the scratch, optimizing it through day and night till I am satisfied with it's performance. So follow my articles, share your thoughts and experience with me and have a good time browsing this blog!
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4 Responses to CSS-Reset – minimizing browser rendering problems

  1. Erik says:

    Actually I’ve been using this a lot over the last year.

    Applying these reset.css rules in the beginning of your CSS work forces you to apply CSS rules more precisely and furthermore prevents a lot of browser-specific differences.

    Anyways, removing padding and margin from lists and their items is evil. This makes some WYSIWYG scenraios unusable (where complete pages get loaded into iframes for example) and thus gets more effort to overwrite the rules twice.

    That’s why I prefer my own reset.css where lists are indented by default.

  2. stevie says:

    Thx for your comment, Erik, nice to know you read us.

    I just started with the script and also fixed a few things (like the default color instead of font-weight for the <strong>-element). For sure I will now check the settings for lists, too.

  3. Erik says:

    Actually I’ve been using this a lot over the last year.

    Applying these reset.css rules in the beginning of your CSS work forces you to apply CSS rules more precisely and furthermore prevents a lot of browser-specific differences.

    Anyways, removing padding and margin from lists and their items is evil. This makes some WYSIWYG scenraios unusable (where complete pages get loaded into iframes for example) and thus gets more effort to overwrite the rules twice.

    That’s why I prefer my own reset.css where lists are indented by default.

  4. stevie says:

    Thx for your comment, Erik, nice to know you read us.

    I just started with the script and also fixed a few things (like the default color instead of font-weight for the <strong>-element). For sure I will now check the settings for lists, too.

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